2014 Jeep Cherokee Mileage Update: 9,437 Miles

Cherokee

Cars.com's 2014 Jeep Cherokee long-term test car continues to improve its overall average mileage after a slow start with somewhat disappointing fuel economy. The four-cylinder, all-wheel-drive Cherokee is steadily climbing toward its 24 mpg combined EPA rating. We've observed an average of 23.67 mpg after 9,437 miles using pump fill-up calculations to monitor long-term mileage, an improvement of 1.07 mpg from our previous update, which was more than 4,200 miles ago.

More on Our Long-Term Test Fleet

By Joe Bruzek | July 28, 2014 | Comments (6)

2014 Chevrolet Impala Ownership Costs: Half Year

Impala_ownership

The first six months and 8,000 miles of owning our Best of 2014 winner, the 2014 Chevrolet Impala, have so far been painless. We threw in a set of $99.95 floormats for the horrible winter, but otherwise haven't had to put any money into maintenance thanks to Chevrolet's complimentary two-year maintenance program.

More on Our Long-Term Test Fleet

At around 6,000 miles the Impala's information display lit up with an uncryptic "change oil soon" notification. Chevrolet recommends changing the oil within 600 miles of the indicator illuminating, so we were off to the dealership to take advantage of the no-charge service plan.

By Joe Bruzek | July 11, 2014 | Comments (0)

What Fits in the 2014 Chevy Impala's Hidden Compartment?

Impala-cubby

You don't typically buy a large sedan to get wowed by gimmicks. You buy one for the comfort, room and ride, but the 2014 Chevrolet Impala in our long-term fleet has a gimmick we've actually found to be useful in our nearly six months of real-world testing.

More Long-Term Test Car Updates

A hidden compartment sits behind the 8-inch touch-screen in the middle of the dashboard. You hit a button to raise the center touch-screen, revealing a small, square-shaped hiding spot. Sure, its location is odd, but it's actually a useful bit of real estate that's good for the usual stuff such as smartphones, music players or a tollway pass ... and some more interesting goodies, too.

Here's what the editors have stashed in it so far:

By Jennifer Geiger | July 10, 2014 | Comments (5)

2014 Jeep Cherokee Versus 2014 Mazda CX-5

IMG_6845

In our latest head-to-head comparison we pit Cars.com's long-term 2014 Jeep Cherokee against a formidable competitor: Mazda's 2015 CX-5. The CX-5 came to us in our regular rotation of press cars and was ripe for a duel with our Cherokee, which was looking for redemption after being defeated by the well-rounded 2014 Nissan Rogue.

More on Our Long-Term Test Fleet

We've had good experiences with both SUVs. The Cherokee was purchased because it's unique to an extreme and impressed our editors with its refined ride quality and class-leading technology. The CX-5 scored second place in Cars.com's $25,000 compact SUV comparison of 2012-13 models a few years ago thanks to its space-efficient design and stylish exterior.

By Joe Bruzek | July 9, 2014 | Comments (17)

Confounded by Car Technology? It's Time to Embrace It

Overwhelmed_technology

Today's technology-laden cars, SUVs and even trucks can be challenging for older drivers as well as car buyers who have been out of the market for several years. I'm among the many mature drivers who don't replace vehicles until they've been driven into the ground — my husband and I often go a decade or more between car purchases. Our current vehicles are of 2004 and 2006 vintage, and they lack much of the technology that's rapidly becoming common, often standard, on today's new cars.

Related: AAA Recommends Car Features for Older Drivers

As a Cars.com's copy editor, I'm encouraged to drive the test vehicles we receive at our Chicago offices so that I can experience the things I read about when I edit articles. I enjoy this part of the job, but it's proven to be a challenge due to unfamiliar technology. I often find myself communing with the owner's manual before I can leave the parking garage with one of our test cars.

Here are a few things other potentially overwhelmed car shoppers of any vintage should prepare to encounter:

By Jen Burklow | July 7, 2014 | Comments (11)

2014 Jeep Cherokee Ownership Costs: First Quarter

IMG_5122

The miles are turning over pretty fast on our long-term 2014 Jeep Cherokee — it's the only fast thing about our four-cylinder, all-wheel drive model. The Cherokee has been a favorite for road trips with its SUV versatility compared to our 2014 Chevrolet Impala long-term tester. We've observed a few quirks so far, but none have required any out-of-pocket expense to fix.

More on Cars.com's Long-Term Fleet

The only required ownership cost outside of fuel has been the Cherokee's first oil change and tire rotation — a total of $84.80. During the last couple of months, we also spent some money on extras such as a dog kennel ($142.41) and cooler ($60), which are accessories for the Cherokee's built-in cargo rail system.

By Joe Bruzek | June 27, 2014 | Comments (5)

2014 Jeep Cherokee Dog Kennel Tested

JeepCherokeeKennel

One of the flashy features in the new Jeep Cherokee is its built-in cargo rail system. It promises flexibility for unique Jeep accessories like the cooler we recently tested. When we decided to purchase other accessories one that stood out was a custom-fit dog crate to keep canines safe on the road.

Get Ready for Summer With Jeep Cherokee's Custom Cooler

The collapsible dog crate is similar to others you would find in the pet supply world. The Jeep version retails at $165. Our internet price was $142.41, including shipping. Similarly sized crates can be had from $60 to $140, but they aren't custom-made for specific cars, a seeming advantage for the Cherokee's rail system. However, even though the Jeep crate is custom-tailored for the Cherokee, it does not use the much-hyped cargo rail at all.

By Jen Burklow | June 18, 2014 | Comments (0)

2014 Jeep Cherokee Mileage Update: 5,192 Miles

IMG_5168

Cars.com's long-term 2014 Jeep Cherokee test car racked up a massive 2,296 miles last month after an extensive road trip that logged almost double the mileage we've recorded in our first three months of ownership. The trip from Chicago to northern New York, then in the reverse direction to Detroit and finally back to Chicago bested many of the Cherokee's previous fuel economy numbers and boosted its overall average by nearly 2 mpg.

More on Our Long-Term Fleet

That trip generated big numbers for the Cherokee, exceeding the EPA's 28 mpg highway rating with a 30.97 mpg tank. If you don't recall, our Cherokee is a four-cylinder model with the base all-wheel-drive system and nine-speed automatic transmission. It's not surprising that the tank with the highest-recorded fuel economy also demolished the previous best range by 68.7 miles, going 419.7 miles before needing to be refueled. The road trip helped bump its overall average from a disappointing 20.68 mpg to a better 22.6 mpg average after 5,192 miles.

By Joe Bruzek | May 27, 2014 | Comments (5)

2014 Chevrolet Impala Mileage Update: 5,456 Miles

IMG_1023
Our long-term 2014 Chevrolet Impala can't seem to return decent fuel economy; it's still averaging a few miles per gallon short of its 22 mpg combined EPA rating. We know the comfy sedan can exceed its 29 mpg highway rating with cruising mileage up around 31 mpg, but it recently logged a new lowest-recorded tank of 17.36 mpg, falling short of its 19 mpg city rating.

More on Our Long-Term Test Cars

The Impala's 20.23 mpg average after 5,456 miles is down slightly (.07 mpg) compared to April's recordings.

By Joe Bruzek | May 23, 2014 | Comments (3)

Get Ready for Summer With Jeep Cherokee's Custom Cooler

IMG_1294

The 2014 Jeep Cherokee's standard cargo module rail system is one of the features we wanted to use more thoroughly before deciding if it's gimmicky or if it's a useful way to keep cargo in check while on the go in our long-term test car. Summer is just around the corner, so it's a perfect time to test Jeep's accessory collapsible cooler designed for the Cherokee's rear rail system.

More on Our Long-Term Fleet

Jeep sells the cooler for $60; it's a fairly typical collapsible cooler with a padded shoulder strap, zipper top and soft flexible walls. The key difference between what you'll find on the shelf of a camping store and this cooler is the hook and strap for the Cherokee's standard cargo rail system. It's supposed to keep the cooler planted in the cargo area when on the go. We loaded up the cooler with ice and drinks to give it a whirl.

By Joe Bruzek | May 20, 2014 | Comments (1)

Search Results

KickingTires Search Results for

Search Kicking Tires

KickingTires iPhone App
Ask.cars.com