2015 Ford Fusion: Car Seat Check

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There's a lot to like about the Ford Fusion, from its turbocharged four-cylinder engine to its distinctive looks. However, after installing child-safety seats in the 2015 Fusion equipped with optional inflatable rear seat belts, I can't say that I like the Fusion's lower Latch anchors.

The lower Latch anchors sit nearly 3 inches into the seat cushions. Other automakers place their anchors either out in the open or about an inch into the cushions. Occasionally, I'll encounter anchors that are 2 inches into the cushions; this deep placement makes it difficult to connect to the anchors. Trying to reach the Fusion's anchors was, well, trying, but what made them even more difficult was the lack of space around them, so maneuvering was challenging. While I had some trouble connecting to the 2013 Fusion's Latch anchors because of seat belt buckle interference when I last tested this car, it was nowhere near this difficult. The 2013 Fusion had a traditional rear seat belt, while the 2015 test car had the optional inflatable seat belts. Perhaps that explains the difference.

How many car seats fit in the second row? Two

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By Jennifer Newman | October 30, 2014 | Comments (0)

With Flu Season Nearing, Keep Germs at Bay in Car

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As parents, many of us are still congratulating ourselves for surviving the start of the school year and its never-ending homework. But there's a new battleground on the horizon, and it's one that could easily affect everyone in your family: cold and flu season.

Related: Carsick Kids? We've Got Tips to Help

The flu is nothing to sneeze at. It sends more young children to the hospital than any other vaccine-preventable illness, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The best way to prevent it and its complications is to get the flu vaccine for yourself and your family. It's recommended for children as young as 6 months old. Of course, the vaccine's effectiveness varies widely from season to season, so parents need to be vigilant when it comes to containing germs.

While many of us are trained to wipe down frequently touched surfaces in our homes (door knobs, light switches) whenever someone has the flu or a nasty cold, how often do those practices carry over to the family car, especially if you carpool? Here are our tips for keeping your car from becoming a petri dish:

By Jennifer Newman | October 28, 2014 | Comments (0)

Use Our Tricks to Keep Halloween Safe This Year

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Here's a scare for parents and drivers: Kids are more than two times as likely to be killed by a car on Halloween night as any other night, according to Safe Kids Worldwide.

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If you're driving on Halloween, remember to slow down and be alert for ghosts and goblins popping out from between parked cars. Safe Kids Worldwide recommends that drivers enter and exit driveways and alleys slowly on Halloween. Make sure to have your car's headlights on — even if it's still daylight — to help trick-or-treaters see your car. And check those headlights before Halloween night to make sure that the bulbs aren't burned out. Keep in-car distractions to a minimum, especially once you're in a neighborhood.

We've published the following tips before to keep kids safe while trick-or-treating. Share your ideas in the comment section below.

By Jennifer Newman | October 28, 2014 | Comments (0)

2015 Toyota Camry: Car Seat Check

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Redesigned for 2015, the Toyota Camry has a new look that will likely cause shoppers to love it or hate it, thanks mostly to its wide-mouth grille. This midsize sedan seats five, but in our tests it only fits two child-safety seats across the backseat.

How many car seats fit in the second row? Two

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By Jennifer Newman | October 24, 2014 | Comments (2)

Ford's Driving Skills for Life Makes Big Impression on My Teen

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While my 14-year-old daughter isn't old enough to drive yet, I jumped at the opportunity to take her to Ford's Driving Skills for Life, an internationally touring program that teaches teen drivers and their parents about road perils that may not be addressed in traditional driver's education programs. I figured there was no better time to start exposing her to some life-saving lessons.

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There was one lesson in particular that my daughter learned at the event, and it wasn't even a lesson the program intended to teach: Among the modules that teens rotate through in this half-day program, drivers get behind the wheel wearing "fatal-vision" goggles. They're designed to simulate the effects of impaired driving, and participants wear them while attempting to navigate at low speeds through a driving course. Since my daughter couldn't drive the course, she got into the backseat while I drove.

By Kristin Varela | October 24, 2014 | Comments (1)

Should My Kid Get the Hand-Me-Down Car?

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My son turned 12 this summer — right around the time my husband's car turned 14, which means the end is nigh (for my husband's car, of course, not my husband). It raised an interesting question: Will whatever we buy as a replacement — our next "second car" — go to my son once he's old enough to drive? If so, my son would push for a Dodge Challenger or Ford Mustang as the replacement for my husband's older car, but what should parents be thinking about when considering whether their next vehicle will become a kid's car somewhere down the line?

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It's National Teen Driver Safety Week, so we're on the case.

Related: Top 10 Used Cars for $10K

Parents first need to decide whether they will pass their current, aging car down to their teen driver or buy a new (or new to them) car for the teen.

Whatever you choose, there are good reasons to buy a brand-new car:

  • You get the newest safety features
  • There are no questions about the car's history
  • You get a full warranty
  • You can choose which features are important (to you, the parent) and which features you should skip for a teen driver (premium stereo, sport-tuned engine — I'm looking at you)

If you're getting a new car you will drive for a few years before it goes to your kid, it's easier to justify the cost. Likewise, if you're going to be driving the car first, insurance will likely be a bit lower by the time the kid gets it, after miles and years have been piled on.

By Sara Lacey | October 23, 2014 | Comments (1)

Defensive Driving Courses Teach Teens Needed Skills

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The basics taught in driver's education just scratch the surface of the driving know-how needed by teens, yet, shockingly, not every state requires teens to go through even basic driver's education before getting their driver's license. A Michelin Tire study of 1,000 teens across the country found that half didn't feel prepared when they got their driver's license.

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How do teens learn what to do if their car starts to spin, how to check their car's tire pressure and how big a difference a slight distraction can make while driving? These are the types of lessons that can be taught within the safety of a supplemental driving program.

Luckily for those of us with teens approaching driving age, or for those who already have their licenses, there are several teen driving programs around the country, ranging from free to low-cost. Here's a roundup of a few of the larger programs:

By Kristin Varela | October 22, 2014 | Comments (2)

Nissan Bumps Pathfinder Prices for 2015

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Nissan's popular seven-passenger crossover got a host of additional standard and optional features for 2015, and all trims levels get a modest price increase. Base two-wheel-drive models of the 2015 Pathfinder start at $30,395, including destination — $300 more than the 2014 version.

Related: 2015 Nissan Pathfinder: What's Changed

The 3.5-liter V-6 and an updated version of the continuously variable automatic transmission continue to 2015; no word yet if the new-for-2014 Pathfinder Hybrid model will return for 2015.

New features this year include blind spot warning and rear cross-traffic alert on SL and Platinum models; hill descent control for all-wheel-drive Pathfinders; a 120-volt outlet on SLs; a dual panoramic moonroof on Platinum trims and the SV model gets fog lights, an auto-dimming rearview mirror and heated side mirrors for 2015. Also new in the SL Tech Package is the Around View Monitor camera system as well as a tow hitch and harness. The SL Premium Package also gets an upgrade with navigation and the Around View Monitor system. Nissan also added a Family Entertainment Package for 2015 with a DVD entertainment system and dual 7-inch screens in the front row's head restraints.

Pathfinder S, SV, SL and Platinum trim levels in front- or all-wheel drive return for 2015; full pricing is below:

By Jennifer Geiger | October 21, 2014 | Comments (2)

Parents As Driving Instructors: What Works?

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There will come a day when parents are the passengers and the kids are behind the wheel. Like all other aspects of parenting, it's good to remember that we are often not the first ones to teach our kids to drive, but because so few parenting books cover "Teaching Your Kid To Drive," we decided to write that chapter ourselves for National Teen Driver Safety Week.

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First off, teaching your kids about cars and safety can begin long before your child — forgive me, teen — gets behind the wheel for the first time. While they're driving, parents can discuss with their kids what's happening out on the road, what the street signs mean, why speed limits exist and how to look both ways when entering an intersection (even if you have the green light). My 12-year-old son and I recently had a conversation about what a protected left turn is. It was cool, and now he's always looking to see if there's an arrow and what color it is.

I talked to moms and dads of older teens to find out what kind of parent is the preferred driving coach and to gather tips. The panel is made up of parents whose kids have received their driving permits (so they can drive with a parent or guardian onboard) or driver's licenses.

By Sara Lacey | October 21, 2014 | Comments (0)

Hey, Parents! We're Sabotaging Our Teen Drivers

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As parents, we often subscribe to a "do as I say, not as I do" mentality. This is dangerously apparent with our teen drivers, and studies have shown that parents are unknowingly sabotaging their teen drivers by demonstrating that mentality. Because it's National Teen Driver Safety Week, let's take a look at the common mistakes parents make that may be hurting their teen drivers.

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Don't Text and Drive (But I Can): We beat teens over the head with the "never text and drive" message, yet they see us do it on a regular basis. According to a 2012 study by Liberty Mutual Insurance and Students Against Destructive Decisions, 91 percent of teens reported seeing their parents talk on cellphones while driving, and 59 percent witnessed their parents sending a text while driving.

Monkey see, monkey do. Teens mirror the behaviors they see: 90 percent of teens say they've talked on cellphones while driving, and 78 percent admitted to sending text messages while driving.

By Kristin Varela | October 20, 2014 | Comments (0)

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