Honda Cargo Wars: How Does 2016 HR-V Compare to Siblings?

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Being the middle child is tough. Your parents are always asking, "Why can't you be more like your older sister?" Meanwhile your bratty little brother gets away with murder. Despite being "born" last, the all-new 2016 Honda HR-V is the middle child in Honda's brood of compact family haulers, smaller than the CR-V crossover and bigger than the Fit subcompact hatchback. Since carrying capacity no doubt tops prospective buyers' lists, we thought we'd see how the HR-V stacks up against its five-passenger siblings.

Related: Research the 2016 Honda HR-V 

The HR-V compact crossover distinguishes itself from the CR-V and Fit with its sporty looks compared with those vehicles' more right-angle-heavy exterior designs; plus, it's about 10 inches shorter than the CR-V and 9 inches longer than the Fit, with a width measuring about 2 inches less than the former and 3 inches more than the latter. Inside, Honda promised the HR-V would provide "unmatched interior spaciousness and cabin versatility." Only real-world users can decide how well those promises will be fulfilled, but in terms of passenger volume, the HR-V certainly holds its own, measuring 100.1 cubic feet compared with the 2014 CR-Vā€™s 104 and the 2015 Fit's 96.

When it comes to cargo space, however, things get considerably more varied. Behind the rear seats, the HR-V has 24.3 cubic feet of room compared with the CR-V's 37.2 and the Fit's 16.6. Meanwhile, with the seats down, maximum cargo space for the HR-V increases nearly 2.5 times to 58.8 cubic feet. The Fit's max cargo space jumps by more than three times to 52.7 cubic feet, while the CR-V's nearly doubles to 70.9 cubic feet.

Check out the graphic below for a side-by-side comparison of cargo volume.

By Matt Schmitz | November 26, 2014 | Comments (1)

2015 Honda CR-V Real-World Cargo Space

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Honda's compact crossover got some exterior styling and powertrain updates for 2015, but one thing that didn't change is the CR-V's roomy cargo area, though an optional new power liftgate joins the lineup this year.

Related: 2015 Honda CR-V: First Drive

Behind the rear seats there's still a competitive 35.3 cubic feet of cargo space ā€” plenty of room for some luggage, loads of grocery bags or even a big stroller. Fold the seat down and there's a maximum of 70.9 cubic feet of space. The CR-V long has been one of the largest compact crossovers in the class, and the update for 2015 doesn't change its impressive people- and cargo-carrying skills.

See how well common cargo items fit in the CR-V's cargo area below.

By Jennifer Geiger | November 13, 2014 | Comments (0)

2014 Mini Cooper S Real-World Cargo Space

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"Mini" has never been an accurate descriptor of the Cooper Hardtop. While small, the car still offers a usable amount of space, and the 2014 redesign only increases its functionality thanks to a larger cargo area.

Related: 2014 Mini Cooper Expert Review

"The cargo area is now 8.7 cubic feet, up from 5.7 cubic feet, with the rear seats in place. This is the measurement with the adjustable cargo floor/shelf flipped up, out of the way, revealing a deeper cargo well similar to what you'll find in most minivans. This allows for two sizable items, like overhead suitcases or perhaps even golf bags, to stand up in the well. However, most users will likely leave the shelf in place, storing some items underneath it and putting more on top. The shelf can ratchet up to a second position, flush with the backs of the rear seats when they're folded flat, for an expanded cargo floor. That total space is 38.0 cubic feet," Cars.com reviewer David Thomas explains in his review.

See how well common cargo items fit in the 2014 Mini Cooper S below.

By Joe Bruzek | November 6, 2014 | Comments (0)

2015 Subaru Outback Real-World Cargo Space

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Subaru's redesigned 2015 Outback is less quirky than before thanks to its streamlined exterior and classed-up interior, though that doesn't make it any less versatile than the Outback we know and love. In fact, a slightly longer wheelbase and overall length mean there's more interior room for passengers and cargo.

Related: 2015 Subaru Outback Expert Review

"The Outback's cargo area has grown slightly, to 35.5 cubic feet of space behind the rear seats, up from 34.3 cubic feet. Fold the standard 60/40-split backseat down to create 73.3 cubic feet, up from 71.3. There are also new release levers, so one tug folds the spring-tensioned seat flat. It's well-done and, if I had my way, would be mandatory on all cars," Cars.com reviewer Bill Jackson said in his review of the 2015 Outback.

There's also a power liftgate that's newly standard on the highest, Limited, trim and available on the Premium trim.

By Joe Bruzek | October 30, 2014 | Comments (1)

2014 Ford C-Max Energi Real-World Cargo Space

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The two versions of Ford's C-Max ā€” the Hybrid and Energi plug-in hybrid ā€” drive similarly but the Energi sets itself apart with its ability to drive an EPA-estimated 20 miles on electric power alone. The Energi's extra stamina comes from a larger lithium-ion battery stuffed in the cargo area that unfortunately, eats into cargo volume; the resulting space is much smaller than the hybrid version's.

Related: 2014 Ford C-Max Energi Review

Cars.com reviewer Aaron Bragman says in his review that "The C-Max Energi replaces the normal hybrid's 1.4-kilowatt-hour lithium-ion battery pack with a much larger, 7.6-kwh battery in the cargo area, which does indeed cut into the rear storage area. It also eliminates the regular C-Max's flat floor when the rear seats are folded."

The C-Max's cargo volume decreases from the Hybrid model's 24.5 cubic feet to 19.2 cubic feet behind the backseat of the C-Max Energi. Below, see how well common items fit in the C-Max Engergi's cargo area.

By Joe Bruzek | October 23, 2014 | Comments (2)

2014 Dodge Journey Crossroad Real-World Cargo Space

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The 2014 Dodge Journey is an SUV that dabbles in a few segments thanks to its low entry price of $20,990 (including destination) undercutting many compact SUV prices and its midsize-SUV-like capability of hauling up to seven occupants with an optional third row of seating. The Journey's cargo space also straddles the line of compact to midsize with 10.7 cubic feet of cargo space behind the optional third row, 39.6 cubic feet behind the second row and a maximum 67.6 cubic feet.

Related: 2014, 2015 Dodge Journey Crossroad Pros and Cons

The smallish 10.7 cubic feet behind the third row doesn't leave much room for a full load of groceries. In the Dodge family, you'll have to step up to the larger Durango for more cargo room behind the third row (17.2 cubic feet) or fold the Journey's third row flat for more cargo space. Plus, the Journey's tall cargo floor height didn't make loading heavy items very easy.

By Joe Bruzek | October 10, 2014 | Comments (0)

Top Minivan? Nissan Quest May Offer Best Cargo Hauling in the Real World

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Minivans are known for their impressive storage wells behind the third-row seats, maximizing cargo space. But what should be said is that the area is more vertical than horizontal. It begs the question, how much of a minivan's cubic footage can you really use?

Related: Can a Minivan Be Stylish?

Well, that depends on what you're carrying. Luggage works well in minivan storage wells because it tends to be stackable and it's not too worrisome when it inevitably falls out when the liftgate is opened. And there's no feeling quite like propping that big stroller upright and still being able to see out the rear window.

But most of us don't carry luggage around in our daily lives, and eventually/thankfully the kids outgrow strollers; it's usually other items such as grocery bags that aren't as sturdy that create challenges in the cargo area. After all, there are only so many grocery bags that can be stored on top of each other.

Which minivans make the best of this cargo conundrum? And what automakers offer optional equipment to keep your stuff wrangled when the cargo space needs an assist? Let's have a look.

By Sara Lacey | October 3, 2014 | Comments (0)

2015 Infiniti QX70 Real-World Cargo Space

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Once known as the Infiniti FX37, the now-called QX70 balances a delicate line between performance car and SUV. It has more cargo space than you'd expect from its long-nose, rear-sloping sports car looks.

Related: 2015 Infiniti QX70 Expert Review

In her review of the QX70, Cars.com reviewer Kristin Varela writes, "There was 24.8 cubic feet of storage space behind the backseat, enough to easily fit four overstuffed kitchen-trash bags full of clothes from my three daughters' annual before-school closet clean-out, along with a large plastic contractor bag full of books. Impressive. I'm not sure this would have been possible in the BMW X3's 19.4 cubic feet of cargo space, and it definitely wouldn't have been in the Porsche Macan, which has only 17.7 cubic feet of cargo space."

The QX70 has 62 cubic feet of total cargo space. See how well the QX70 handles common cargo items below.

By Joe Bruzek | September 25, 2014 | Comments (1)

How Much Can You Stow in the 2014 Chevy Impala's Cubbies?

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The 2014 Chevrolet Impala's 18.8 cubic feet of trunk space is downright massive for a sedan, but it's not the only impressive storage feat inside our long-term test car. The front seats are a compulsive organizer's dream with treasure trove of big and little storage spaces within easy reach. There's a hidden storage compartment behind the retractable touch-screen, dual umbrella holders and numerous other ways to store cellphones, wallets, music players and more.

Related: More Long-Term Test Car Coverage

There are so many cubbies that we wanted to see just how much stuff can seamlessly fit in the Impala's large collection of storage areas.

By Joe Bruzek | September 17, 2014 | Comments (0)

2015 Honda Fit: Real-World Cargo Space

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The subcompact Honda Fit is a marvel of space efficiency considering its small exterior dimensions hide an interior that rivals the cargo capacity of larger SUVs. All 52.7 cubic feet of cargo space with the backseat folded and 16.6 cubic feet with the backseat upright are easy to use with a low cargo load floor and the large dimensions of the cargo opening.

Related: 2015 Honda Fit Expert Review

Redesigned for 2015, the Fit's cargo area is 3.1 inches longer than before, though maximum space is down slightly compared to the previous Fit. A trick up the Fit's sleeve is the front seat's ability to recline all the way and fit cargo up to 7 feet 9 inches long. See how well the 2015 Fit handles common cargo below.

By Joe Bruzek | September 11, 2014 | Comments (0)

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