Heat Map Shows Auto-Theft Hot Spots

CarTheftHeatMap

Worried about whether you live near a hot spot for hot cars? Tracking-and-recovery system manufacturer LoJack's map shows if you need to sweat it or not. Created using both the FBI's 2011 Uniform Crime Report and National Insurance Crime Bureau's 2011 Hotspots list, the map shows the top five auto-theft states were California, Texas, Illinois, New York and Georgia. Among cities cited by both the FBI and NICB as having high auto-theft rates were Detroit, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, San Diego, San Francisco and Seattle.

According to the data, there were 715,373 auto thefts in 2011, resulting in a $4.3 billion total loss. Following an eight-year downward trend in auto theft nationwide, NICB reported a 1.3% increase in 2012 — a particularly untimely spike given that the national recovery rate for stolen vehicles has fallen to an all-time low of 52%.

Check out LoJack's heat map below for more info.

Heat Map

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By Matt Schmitz | July 12, 2013 | Comments (6)

Comments 

Considering that the crime stats and population numbers are being ignored here I am guessing this article was written by an idiot. Oklahoma has three times the vehicle theft numbers that the city of Los Angeles does with 200,000 lower population so that state should be rated higher than California as a hot spot...

I’m always looking for car sites to visit, this was very helpful. Keep up the infor­ma­tive work!

E

@none they do factor in population...

http://www.laredopd.com/index.php/press-room/news/item/9-laredo-texas-off-nicb-s-top-ten-list-of-car-theft-cities.html

"Laredo, Texas off NICB’s top ten list of car theft cities!

The city of Laredo was ranked #1 in auto thefts in the US according to our population to reported stolen car ratio in 2009. The National Insurance Crime Bureau has just released its 2010 Annual Report and the city of Laredo is off the top ten list."

https://www.nicb.org/newsroom/nicb_campaigns/hot_spots
download report methodology
"The calculation performed is: (number of thefts/prior year's estimated population)*100,000 rounded out to two decimal places"

Pretty wild LoJack recovery stories here: http://www.autotheftblog.com

Found this article really interesting and thanks http://fortworthsecuritycameras.com for keeping the crooks away!

Six

Umm, the top auto theft states are the top states for population -- per capita data would actually be meaningful.

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