Consumers Want Backup Cameras, Blind Spot Systems

Backup_cam

Consumer interest is growing in safety features such as backup cameras, blind spot warning systems and pedestrian alerts, according to a survey released Wednesday by Harris Interactive. It stands in contrast to fewer people caring about safety versus traditional vehicle needs — like gas mileage and quality — as cars become safer by the year.

The tangibility of such features could be driving interest. Features that elevated auto safety in the past decade — electronic stability systems, antilock brakes, side curtain airbags — are largely required by law today, but most were hidden from the driving experience. By contrast, a backup camera or blind spot warning system are used several times in a single commute.

Harris says such features beat out entertainment technologies like satellite radio and voice activation. That’s no surprise, given last week's J.D. Power and Associates Initial Quality Study showed such systems often go on the fritz.

The safety technology may come in handy. Harris says new-car buyers admitted to 37 distracted-driving habits each in the past four weeks. Among them were 11 phone calls, eight beverage consumptions and eight texts or emails behind the wheel. Eighteen-to-34 year-olds copped to more distractions than their older peers, as did males versus females.

Other survey findings:

  • Consumers would rather dock their phones with an entertainment system, like a simple USB connection, than use integrated features like Toyota's Entune or Ford's Sync App Link.
  • Those who use app integration prefer Google Maps and Google Search over Pandora, Facebook or Twitter.
  • Even though most smartphones offer portable navigation, most consumers still prefer built-in dashboard systems.

Related
See More Car Gadgets
Safety Technology Explained
More Automotive News

Consumer interest is growing in safety features such as backup cameras, blind spot warning systems and pedestrian alerts, according to a survey released Wednesday (1) by Harris Interactive. It stands in contrast to fewer people caring about safety (2) versus traditional vehicle needs – like gas mileage and quality – as cars become safer by the year (3).

 

The tangibility of such features could be driving interest. Features that elevated auto safety in the past decade – electronic stability systems, antilock brakes, side curtain airbags – are largely required by law today, but most were hidden from the driving experience. By contrast, a backup camera or blind spot warning system are used several times in a single commute.

 

Harris says such features beat out entertainment technologies like satellite radio and voice activation. That’s no surprise, given last week's J.D. Power and Associates Initial Quality Study showed (4) such systems often go on the fritz.

 

The safety technology may come in handy. Harris says new-car buyers admitted to 37 distracted-driving habits each in the past four weeks. Among them were 11 phone calls, eight beverage consumptions and eight texts or emails behind the wheel. Eighteen-to-34 year-olds copped to more distractions than their older peers, as did males versus females.

 

Other survey findings:

 

-          Consumers would rather dock their phones with an entertainment system, like a simple USB connection, than use integrated features like Toyota's Entune or Ford's Sync App Link.

-          Those who use app integration prefer Google Maps and Google Search over Pandora, Facebook or Twitter.

-          Even though most smartphones offer portable navigation, most consumers still prefer built-in dashboard systems.

Related
See More Car Gadgets (5)
Safety Technology Explained
(6)
More Automotive News (7)

 

Comments 

RealGomer

I had a blind spot system on my 1972 Pinto and on every car since. They're called MIRRORS. Just adjust them to cover the blind spots. No gimmicks, no electronics, no excessive costs. Sheesh, people are incompetent.

yeah and then what happens when the camera distracts you from your surrounding and then you hot soething else?

Yurp

Saying that cameras are distracting is like saying mirrors or dashboards are distracting.

Yurp

Hurrrrr but dem cameras are Satan box gizmos! Some of you luddites are unbelievable. You'll have to get over being afraid of electronics in cars, pretty much every car made in the last 15 years has them in some form.

Highdesertcat

We have a backup camera in my wife's 2012 Grand Cherokee that's part of the Nav/stereo system. It only comes on when you put the vehicle in reverse.

You can turn it On manually but it automatically reverts back to the Nav or radio/satellite display after a few minutes if you're driving forward.

It's handy, but you still need to use the side mirrors and rear-view mirror because the camera view still has some blindspots, up high and on both sides.

A friend has a similar system in his Impala and it works pretty much the same way -- like only when you're in reverse.

The camera came with the Nav, blue tooth and radio/satellite/MP3/CD stereo system, and uses the same display for everything.

We could live without it, but it came with the car when we bought it.

Max

As far as I'm concerned, cameras in cars are a great idea. Link all the feeds to a looped storage device and then access the data if you have an accident.

I'm not a conspiracy theorist but a provocative thought... could cameras in vehicles be another way for big brother to keep tabs on its citizens?

How is it even possible to put one if these on a mirrior. People just like the idea because it sounds and looks cool.

I don't understand why people cant take the few extra seconds to look over there shoulder and in there mirrors. The only thing i see being accomplished by adding backup cameras is the increase in the price of the vehicle.

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