Ignoring Vehicle Recalls is Dangerous

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Ignoring a vehicle safety recall threatens public safety, and according to a new study from Carfax, it's a big problem. The group's study found that more than 2.7 million used cars were for sale online last year with open safety recalls.

The worst states were California, Florida and Texas; each listed more than 100,000 cars for sale with open recalls last year.

"Many of these cars change hands without the buyer ever knowing a recall exists, increasing the safety risks both to passengers in the car and others on the road. We all need to do our part to make sure these cars are identified and fixed — buyers, sellers and owners alike," said Larry Gamache, communications director at Carfax.

Since getting a recalled car fixed is free, cost shouldn't prohibit consumers from taking their car to the dealership for the repair. Is your car or truck one of the millions of vehicles with an unfixed safety recall? To look up a recall, visit the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's website or call NHTSA's vehicle safety hotline at 888-327-4236.

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Comments 

Thank you for this safety information. This would really help me to be more wiser on safety tips and seller scams. It is really a big problem ignoring this safety recall.

This surprising statistic from Carfaxserves as a reminder that prospective car buyers should do their due diligence and check online recall resources before purchasing any used vehicles. While auto manufacturers are currently working with Carfax to alert consumers about cars that have been involved in a recall, it is better to spend a couple of minutes doing research than to take the chance of putting your family or others on the road in danger. What do you think of Carfax’s findings?

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