2013 Toyota RAV4 EV: First Look

2013 toyota rav4 ev
The expanding electric car club will get its first compact SUV for model-year 2013. The all-electric version of Toyota's compact crossover will go on sale this summer with a base price of $49,800.

Toyota partnered with Tesla on the 2013 RAV4 EV; it paid the electric car company approximately $100 million to supply the RAV4 EV's powertrain, including the battery, motor, gearbox and power electronics.

The RAV4 EV will be available in front-wheel drive only and use an electric powertrain with a maximum output of 154 horsepower. It will offer drivers two modes: In Sport mode, RAV4 EV will do zero to 60 mph in 7 seconds and have a max speed of 100 mph. In Normal mode, those numbers drop to 8.6 seconds and 85 mph, respectively. The dashboard display color changes to red when in Sport mode and blue in Normal mode. Toyota expects the RAV4 EV to have a driving range of around 100 miles and a charging time of about six hours on a 240-volt charger.

The electric version looks a lot like the gas-powered RAV4. Minor exterior tweaks include a restyled front bumper, updated upper and lower grille, new side mirrors, a unique rear spoiler and under-body tweaks designed to maximize air flow. Also new are LED head- and taillights. It'll be available in three new EV-specific colors: Blizzard White Pearl, Shoreline Blue Pearl and Classic Silver Metallic.

Inside, shiny blue-accented woven fabric — Toyota calls it Neutron — trims the cabin. Standard equipment includes heated front seats, an 8-inch touch-screen with navigation, the Entune multimedia system, Bluetooth connectivity and a USB port. Also, Toyota says the RAV4 EV’s battery doesn’t steal any cabin space and its cargo capacity is the same as the regular model: 73 cubic feet.

Availability will be limited initially; it'll only be on sale this summer at select dealerships in California, including Sacramento, San Francisco Bay area, Los Angeles/Orange County and San Diego. Toyota hopes to sell around 2,600 RAV4 EVs during the next three years.

Clicking on any image below will launch a larger photo gallery; you can browse through them by hitting the right and left arrow keys.

2013 Toyota RAV4 EV

2013 Toyota RAV4 EV

2013 Toyota RAV4 EV

2013 Toyota RAV4 EV

2013 Toyota RAV4 EV

Comments 

Bowrider

50 large for an outdated looking CUV with an antiquated interior. Although the high price tage is a result of the powertrain, I couldn't do it.

Excellent review guys...
But can you tell me how long this model can be driven with this type of battery ?

artswanson

$50K for this POS and it can only do 100 miles per charge, nice! $40K large for the Volt and it will only burn you alive when its battery explodes! Toyota is nuts, but the goofballs in SoCal will "just luv it" because is wont smell the air and hurt the birdies and little fishys. Meanwhile the rest of us are waiting for some real high milege cars that are not glorified golf carts or tinfoil wrapped squirrel cages.

Keith

Let's not forget that the gov't kicks in $8k of your money to everyone who buys these overpriced and often unpractical cars. Because people who can spend $40k on a car need free money from the gov't...

Oughtamobile

This looks like a great vehicle for those who can afford it. Those who can't are jealous and complain about it.

Fabulous, i am really looking forward having my own toyota wheels. Thank you for this information that makes me urge to purchase one.

Foxhound199

I love the idea of electric on a commuter car, but a recreational vehicle that can only take you 50 miles from home? Seems like it kind of defeats the purpose.

Joel Turner

When will the 2013 Rav4 be available?

Get Real

For those of you who are obviously biased against electric cars regardless of who's making them or what the product actually is, I'd advise you to get used to them. Electric cars are the car of the future. As a staunch libertarian, I can't think of something that should be MORE endorsed. Electric cars DO improve air quality. B/c of economy of scale, they DO reduce energy consumption. They also decrease noise in urban environments and mostly they make the production of energy for transportation something that is truly capitalist b/c now multiple different companies (solar/gas/nuclear, etc) can compete for energy production...not just 3 huge oil companies..that's real capitalism. Finally, it is the real threat of electric vehicles that will make OPEC continue to keep oil prices down. They're here. Get used to them. Just like we got rid of slavery, child labor, a 7 day work-week, and the notion that tobacco is good for us...we will also realize that the ICE is going the way of the steam engine. If you don't endorse this, you're not much of a capitalist!

Nate

Yes, were only worried about the birdies and fish. Loving the extended temps (100 - 108 with heat indices 115 - 120) here in the heart of the US. People are of course immune to what causes the death of all other things. Lawn dying ..., in the news we have fires, floods, and storms around the US. If trends continue ..., in the future will the US continue to be a major crop producer. My solar (installed in the last two years with the help of state and federal incentives) is providing 100% plus of my homes power consumption on average. During the summer months ..., the last month of June provided 166% of consumption here in southern Illinois. My in-ground geothermal heat pump (installed three years ago with help of state and federal incentives) uses below ground temps to keep my home nice and cool in summer and warm in winter and without allot of power consumption. I look forward to purchasing an electric vehicle. Hope to achieve that by the end of this year (with the help of state and federal incentives). I like the idea of low maintenance costs apparent with electric vehicles. Should fit nicely for my local commuting/driving needs which comprise most of my driving. I will want to make sure to keep at least one vehicle that can run long distance for vacations. I will be thrilled to leverage the power of the sun through my Solar Array putting the power to use powering a car. Doing this should dramatically improve the Return on Investment (ROI) for the Solar Array. The cost to run a vehicle an annual average of 15,000 miles should be about $450/annually at a seven cent per kilo-watt-hour (kWh) basing this on stated Tesla conversion rate. Wish I could afford the new Tesla "S" sedan with an electric range of 160 miles. Wish the Chevy Volt had a larger battery pack so all EV range is more like 100 miles. Wish the Nissan Leaf had a larger battery pack so could support 160 mile all EV range.

Nate

If state and federal incentives are your problem consider that the last time I checked most energy has been and continues to be hugely subsidized by state and federal (you and I). Consider the oil from this country ..., which is the countries resource (you and I) creating huge "profits" for "corporations". By the way for those who miss the point ..., profits are computed after expenses are subtracted. Expenses include salaries, equipment etc. Despite huge profits this industry continues to be subsidized today. Research the billions if not trillions put into the early research and then direct subsidies to all energy including coal, gas, and nuclear over the year. Consider the ongoing costs that are not being factored into energy useage.

toby

will all the 2013 rav 4 be electric?

Roger

So, Toyota is planning to build and sell a whopping 2900 of these babies over the 3 yrs. It seems as though they have very low expectations of the Ev market. Or, am I missing something? Oh yeah, I forgot, Chevron owns the rights to some really good quality, long range Ev batteries. Oh, and won't allow anyone, especially car makers to use the battery technology for anything larger than a bicycle. The real a€€holes are the money grubbing, greedy, oil companies. Their only concern is forcing all gas guzzling car owners, to continue to be slaves to them. Currently, if I had $100,000, you can bet I'd be buying the Tesla. Even if I somehow knew the maintenance costs and charging fees were put in place. If for no other reason, than to drive the oil companies out of business! While I praise Toyota for dipping a toe into the Ev market, I must ask the question? Toyota (and all other car makers), who are you really afraid of?

Kelly

To correct the record of the misstatement above, no Chevy Volt in service or in a crash has ever caught on fire. One Volt caught on fire 3 days after it was crash tested because the liquids and batteries had not been drained or discharged even though it is a standard procedure to do so with all crash test vehicles.

An attempt to re-create the fire by crash testing another Volt resulted in no fire. No Volts that have been in collisions have caught on fire since that one test vehicle which was not properly handled.

Even though no fire danger existed when the car is properly handled after a crash, Chevy made changes to the battery compartment so that even if the car was not drained of fluids and the batteries not discharged, no fire would be possible.

Please remember that over 200,00 gas cars per year catch on fire, killing hundreds of people every year and 5,000 gas stations catch on fire each year as well killing many, many people. Nobody has died from a fire in an electric car in the U.S.

Lori

Toyota had a wonderful EV version of the RAV4 back in the 1990's (98 and 99). It got great mileage and the people who drove them loved them. They never were available for the general public. They were fleet cars.

Gad

We welcome all electrical cars and trucks to Tangier and Casablanca Morocco ASAP

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