2012 Toyota Prius V, 2012 Prius Plug-in Priced at $26,400 and $32,000

2012 Prius Plug-in
Toyota has priced its 2012 Prius V and 2012 Prius Plug-in at $26,400 and $32,000, respectively, excluding a $760 destination charge.

The Prius V, which will go on sale in October, will come in three trims: Prius V Two, Prius V Three and Prius V Five.

The base Prius V Two costs $26,400 and comes with a 6.1-inch display screen and integrated backup camera, Bluetooth connectivity, USB port, 16-inch alloy wheels and a passive entry system. The Prius V Three adds navigation and Toyota’s new Entune multimedia system for $27,165. The Prius V Five adds SofTex upholstery (a leather-like upholstery as durable as cloth, Toyota says), heated front seats, 17-inch alloy wheels, LED headlamps and fog lamps. The Prius V Five starts at $29,990.

2012 Toyota Prius VToyota also released final specs and pricing for its 2012 Prius plug-in hybrid. The model, simply called the Prius Plug-in, can drive on electricity alone for up to 15 miles — 2 to 3 miles more than originally reported. All-electric mode will work only at speeds of up to 62 mph; otherwise, the hybrid will get 49 mpg in either city or highway driving. That’s a 2-mpg loss for city mileage but a 1-mpg improvement for highway mileage compared with the regular Prius.

The Prius Plug-in weighs only 123 pounds more than the regular Prius — the lithium-ion battery pack weighs 176 pounds — and that’s why Toyota said it was able to keep fuel efficiency pretty much the same.

The Prius Plug-in can be fully charged in two-and-a-half to three hours with a 120-volt plug or in 90 minutes with a 240-volt plug – considerably faster than the Chevrolet Volt’s 10-hour charging time at 120 volts and four hours at 240 volts, though the Volt gets better EV range at 35 miles. Even when using gas, the Prius Plug-in will rely more on its electric-only capability compared with a regular Prius. Toyota sells a 240-volt home-charging unit for $999.

2012 Prius Plug-in (2)
The Prius Plug-in comes in two trims: Base and Advanced. The $32,000 base trim gets you heated seats, passive entry system with push-button start, touch-screen, navigation, backup camera, Entune multimedia system and a remote-controlled air-conditioning system that can precondition the cabin using either grid power or the Prius’ battery.

For $39,525, the Advanced trim throws in every tech option Toyota has available, including a head-up display, LED headlamps, SofTex seating, eight-way adjustable power driver’s seat, JBL audio, pre-collision warning system, adaptive cruise control and a safety telematics system.

Every Plug-in gets chrome garnishes, LED taillights and blue-accented headlights, all to further distinguish the model from the regular Prius.

Both models are eligible for a $2,500 federal tax credit. Compared with other vehicles that operate on some sort of electricity — the Mitsubishi i ($29,195), Nissan Leaf ($35,200) and the Volt ($39,145) — the Prius slots toward the more affordable end of the plug-in category. Although the Prius Plug-in is larger and has more cargo space than the other three, it can’t travel very far on electricity alone.   

The Prius Plug-in goes on sale next month in 14 states, including California, New Jersey, New York and Massachusetts. It will be available nationwide in 2013. 

Comments 

WTF

Maybe the worst trim naming scheme ever. Dodge used to have it but they wised up and changed.

Prius V Five

Do you say Prius "Five" Five or Prius "V" Five?

Rockaby

"The model, simply called the Prius Plug-in, can drive on electricity alone for up to 15 miles — 12 to 13 miles more than originally reported."

Wait, so it originally was only supposed to get 2-3 miles with electricity and then get the same fuel economy as the original Prius?!

WTF

"The Prius PHV does the same — more often and noisier — once the initial charge is depleted after a maximum of 13 miles."

This statement is from your Head-to-Head comparison back in March. Seems to me that you knew the range would be 13 then and it's 15 now. Why the "12 to 13 miles more than originally reported"?

Max Reid

Fantastics News.

Prius PHV has 15 mile electric range and costs just 32K compared to 35 mile range of Volt which costs 39K.

For many people whose commute is 20 miles / day, they will run 75% on Electric every day.

Sale starts next month is another nice news. Hope this will boost the total Prius sales.

Also the Prius V with much more interior space and 41MPG could challenge many CUVs like Escape, CRV, RAV4, etc.

Great job Toyota

Amuro Ray

@ MR,

Since it only takes like 3hr to charge full on a 110V outlet, it's possible to drive 100% EV on the PPI too.

The ONLY, and the most IMPORTANT issue it that gas prices are going higher and higher, and you still need gas on the PPI. OPEC is not gonna help anyone, as they have already decided to cut back supply due to a "worsening economy," aka potential price drop in oil prices.

However, unless GM does sthg with the Volt, this is definitely a nail in the coffin for the Volt, which doesn't have the mpg (since it's on ICE only, unlike PPI) that the PPI has once EV charges have depleted.

Amuro Ray

Actually, there's a secondary, long term (and unknown problem), for all these PHEVs, specifically PPI & Volt.

Most drivers will try to maximize the time they can on E-only mode, and that means complete discharge - well, kinda - of the battery, and very frequent (once or even twice a day) to fully recharge the battery, using the plug. That's in contrast to letting the dirty ICE engine to do its job to have the battery at a semi-charged state. Whatever battery maintenance mechanism being implemented, I can't believe that this is good for the battery, esp Li+ battery...maybe someone with better battery knowledge can comment.

WTF

I'll comment. Deep discharge of the battery is limited to minimize long term degradation. The Volt and Leaf only use approximately 70-80% (don't remember exact figures) of their battery capacities.

WTF

Max,

And the Volt owner will run on 100% electric during that commute.

Max Reid

While Prius PHV can compete with Leaf, Volt & MIEV, the Prius V can compete with Fusion-H, Camry-H, Sonata-H, Optima-H and even Escape-H.

There is going to be a big-shakeout in the Hybrid area.

Hope the Q4 Hybrid sales will increase. In Japan Prius is the best selling vehicle outselling Corolla 4:1

pat

range of 15 miles, what a joke!!

Amuro Ray

Depends on the distance, all PHEV can commute using EV-mode only. However, only a true EV can "not having the need to" think about - will I use gasoline on my commute.

PPI's competitor is with Volt These are PHEV. Volt is NOT a competitor of LEAF. iMEV, Coda, electric Smart, e-Mini, etc. are competitors of LEAF. These are ZEV.

As for battery discharge / recharge, I've already mentioned the protective mechanism in a high level. The problem (my question) is that the daily dis/re-charge to almost the max on both PPI and Volt (for those who insist on staying EV-mode at all times) is that the max charging is bad to the battery, and there is a limited # of full-cycle charge (including the safety mechanism) before seeing battery performance degradation. If I remember correctly, LEAF has a 1000 cycle. If using 30 mi commute / day, assuming good commute that require you to charge 2 times a week, that's roughly 10 years of life in an ideal scenario.

But when you've to charge ONCE everyday, you will reach the 1000 cycle in less than 4 years, as in the case for the Volt, or 2 years in the case of PPI. Even if you don't go to the extreme, I don't think that you'll get 2 times the life out of the Li batteries.

Carma

This is an eminently practical design for urban living. Many of the trips I take are just a couple miles to the hardware store, dry cleaners or restaurant. For those trips you go electric only, and 15 miles covers lots of those routes. Even my commute to work is only 5 miles one way so I could do that on electricity only. For long trips you get eye popping mileage - an average of 87 mpg when you charge the battery and then drive it as a normal hybrid.

I don't understand why Toyota needs both models. From the untrained eye, they look identical - the V is only slightly larger, right?

Regardless, both models belong on this list...

http://youarewhatyoudrive.blogspot.com/2011/08/cars-for-people-who-have-lots-of-money.html

Card13

WTF-

The "V" in the name is the letter, not the Roman numeral. The trim levels used to be designated by Roman numerals, but the numbers are now spelled out to avoid confusion (Prius V V). I believe the "V" stands for versatile or something.

Bill at YAWYD-

The difference in cargo space between the V and standard Prius is pretty significant. Other cars (i.e. Focus and Mazda6) have offered hatchbacks alongside traditional wagon variants.

Max Reid

If we drive 15 miles/day on Electric and 6 days / week(5 day commute and 1 day for Shopping), then we will be driving
15 miles * 300 days / year and that's 4,500 miles / year on Electric alone.

For a person who drives 12,000 miles / year, its
4,500 / 12,000 * 100 = 37%.

So 15 mile battery range is good enough. Besides if your office parking lot has a small EV charger, then you can drive Electric miles on the way home, so the above 37% may go upto 50%.

Next year spring time, we are also getting Ford C-Max Hybrid & Plugin version.

Max Reid

Prius V is significantly larger than Prius. In Japan & Europe, its sold in 7 seater version.

So, we can place a back facing stow seat and make it a 7 seater. This is the advantage of a wagon as it can use the full rear space which cannot be done in a sedan.

The trims are getting confusing, Prius V is called Prius + in Europe and Prius Alpha in Japan. They should have 1 name which is also different from Trims. Ideal thing is to use numbers like 1,2,3 for smaller version 10,20,30 for regular version and 100,200,300 for larger version.

Jferrari427

Wow, spending $32,000+ on a car to START saving money on fuel makes perfect financial sense!!!! It would take DECADES of driving to make that car pay off in fuel savings.

Max Reid

Hello Jferrari427

what return on investment are you going to get on Ferrari or Porsche or Hummer.

You spend $100,000 on the vehicle and another $100,000 on its fuel.

Prius PHV will have a more smoother drive than Benz or BMW of Audi or Lexus of that size, yet it costs $ 3-4 K lesser, so right away you get the Return on Investment, plus you get more by cutting your visit to Gas Station.

WTF

Don't think so. From Cars.com's very own test:

"I was glad to drive it over the most rutted segment of our test route, and even gladder afterward when I saw the faces of senior editor David Thomas and photographer Ian Merritt, who had been in the Prius PHV. We now know how paint feels in the shaker at Home Depot. Seriously. The word "disaster" was uttered. The regular Prius is no paragon of ride comfort, but the PEV's suspension — revised for the added battery weight — clearly needs work."

sheth

Priced too close to leaf and volt considerng its limitations. Plus, other sources say it goes on sale in 2012, not next month. I thought toyota said from the beginning that it went on sale in 2012.

sheth

THis is the plug in with the least elec only capability. Why wouldnt it be the cheapest? And it hits the market in spring 2012 in only 14 states- rest of the country has to wait until 2013. A lot of Leafs and Volts will sell by 2013. Plus focus electric is coming out.

2sk21

We have been looking for a replacement for our 10 year old Sienna. The Prisu V looks to be a good alternative. We don't often need the full seven seat capability of the van but additional cargo space is always welcome.

Max Reid

Hello 2sk21

If you want 7-seater functionality, you can add 2 stow seats at the back, it has enough space there. So Prius V is very functional and also it should give 40+ MPG.

Amuro Ray

That's incorrect, MR, on the Prius V having 7 seats.

The JDM version is, afaik.

Toyota abandoned that idea for the USDM, saying that it "may" be possible for sthg else (another hybrid). I remember seeing sthg here in Kickingtires, or its competitors.

Too bad, 'coz I would have gotten one myself :(

P.S. After market for 3rd row isn't available, since vehicle isn't out, and even if it is, I seriously doubt it (the company that does it - the one that I know - seems to sell only for larger SUVs).

Max Reid

Hi Amuro

http://www.tstech.co.jp/english/product/technology-attractive.html

I have seen a Honda Fit with 2 stow back facing seats in Chicago. Fit is smaller, yet it has lower base. I am sure the Prius V which is much bigger should be able to have stow seats.

Now a days, CUVs/ Wagons are the best selling class and soon, companies will start selling such seats.

PETER KAtz

WHEN WILL THE PRIUS PLUG-IN BE AVAILABLE IN FLORIDA
I LIVE IN BOYNTON BEACH NEAR DELRAY BEACH FL

Carl Steinke

I spend almost $300.oo on Fuel in Last 3 days at cost of $3.79 a Gallon I Bought a New Prius3 and my Car payments $360.00 a month already I've Driven all week and I haven't had to buy gas yet so instead of my moneys now going to the Big Oil Company's the trade off is I get to save Money & fuel and I'll owe a car when its said and done instead of making a payment to Oil company where I get nothing in return....the fuel savings is paying my car payment and I'll own it..

The information provided here is of the utmost quality http://bollywoodgaane.com/bollywood_songs.html

WHEN WILL THE PRIUS PLUG-IN BE AVAILABLE IN FLORIDA
I LIVE IN BOYNTON BEACH NEAR DELRAY BEACH FL

Priced too close to leaf and volt considerng its limitations. Plus, other sources say it goes on sale in 2012, not next month. I thought toyota said from the beginning that it went on sale in 2012.

range of 15 miles, what a joke!!

We have been looking for a replacement for our 10 year old Sienna.

The Prisu V looks to be a good alternative. We don't often need the full seven seat capability of the van but additional cargo space is always

Most drivers will try to maximize the time they can on E-only mode, and that means complete discharge - well, kinda - of the battery, and very frequent (once or even twice a day) to fully recharge the battery, using the plug. That's in contrast to letting the dirty ICE engine to do its job to have the battery at a semi-charged state. Whatever battery maintenance mechanism being implemented, I can't believe that this is good for the battery, esp Li+ battery...maybe someone with better battery knowledge can comment.

good topic thanks admin

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