Honda, Toyota EV Intros Not Ready for Prime Time

Rav4ev

Two electric cars introduced at the Los Angeles Auto Show underscore how far ahead the Nissan Leaf is in the battery-electric car field. Neither the Toyota RAV4 EV nor the Honda Fit EV shown today were the versions U.S. consumers can expect to see when they go on sale in 2012. Both companies will engage in small-scale real-world testing of their cars in 2011.

Though it drove onto the stage under electric power, the Honda Fit EV Concept shown is a conversion that “hints strongly at the direction and styling for Honda’s upcoming production Fit EV all-electric vehicle,” according to Honda. Though the production car will be based on the current generation Fit, the concept car doesn’t reflect any effect the electric powertrain’s integration will have on interior space. Honda says the changes should be minimal, however, perhaps affecting the multi-folding capability of the rear seats, but not eating up too much interior space.


Toyota’s RAV4 EV, which was co-developed with Tesla Motors, was introduced as a “demonstration vehicle,” of which 35 will be built for testing purposes in 2011. Toyota describes these models as conversions and emphasizes that the production vehicle slated for 2012 will be “engineered.” The RAV4 was last redesigned in 2006, which means the 2012 might be a redesigned model. While Toyota, like most automakers, won’t comment on future plans, it’s unlikely the company would invest in a powertrain for a generation that’s due for replacement. This would follow Ford’s approach with the Focus; it developed electric versions with Magna. The cars have been driving around in test fleets for years, but the production version won’t hit the market until 2012 in the new Focus generation that rolls out this year in gas-powered form.

In production form, the Fit EV and RAV4 EV will be powered by lithium-ion batteries and are both expected to have a range of 100 miles.

More L.A. Auto Show Coverage

Comments 

Six

Funny, the Volt and Leaf actually show up to market, and it's Toyota and Honda that are scrambling to follow.

Cory singer

I would hardly call it scrambling...at least with Honda, while they took a wait and see attitude with EVs, they clearly were doing the R and D behind the scenes, or the car would not be coming to market with next year's (2012) models..but yes the Volt, a plug in hybrid, is beating both Toyota's and Honda's plug in hybrids to the market...

Shakespeare's Juliet might have explained That which we call a rose by some other brand name would scent as sweet, but it really is an excellent wager that Juliet hadn't actually attempted to select a fantastic website label for her web pages. It truly is an even more desirable guess that she did not attempt to location a price around the identity when the time came to promote it, a little something a lot more men and women are facing immediately.

Post a Comment 

Please remember a few rules before posting comments:

  • If you don't want people to see your email address, simply type in the URL of your favorite website or leave the field empty.
  • Do not mention specific car dealers by name. Feel free to mention your city, state and brand.
  • Try to be civil to your fellow blog readers. This blog is not a fan or enthusiast forum, it is meant to help people during the car-buying process and during the time between purchases, so shoppers can keep a pulse on the market.
  • Stay on topic. We want to hear your opinions and thoughts, but please only comment about the specified topic in the blog post.
view posting rules

If you have a TypeKey or TypePad account, please Sign In

Search Results

KickingTires Search Results for

Search Kicking Tires

KickingTires iPhone App
Ask.cars.com