U.S. Gas Demand Hits All-Time High in March

Pumpinggas
Serving as a sign of both economic recovery and harbinger of troubles that lie ahead, demand for gasoline in the U.S. hit an all-time high in March. U.S. refineries produced more than 9.3 million barrels of gas per day, which is greater than any other single month in U.S. history, according to the American Petroleum Institute.

Not all of that fuel was delivered, though. Only 9.2 million barrels were delivered per day, which is still an all-time high for any March on record. The all-time record is for July 2007 when the industry was delivering 9.6 million a day.

Sure, hybrids are selling better than ever and the first mass-market electric and plug-in hybrids are set to go on sale, but it will take a long time for this to dampen demand for gas.

As the country pulls out of the recession and the economy begins to grow (knock on wood), this will only increase fuel demand. Furthermore, it’s not even summer, which is when gasoline demand generally peaks.

In other words, summer ’10 could prove to be an eye-bulging one at the pump.

U.S. Demand for Gasoline Sets All-Time Record for March, Trend Expected to Continue Throughout Summer (AutoblogGreen)

By Stephen Markley | April 20, 2010 | Comments (11)
Tags: In The News

Comments 

Scott

So was the gas actually sold, or just produced? Was it delivered to gas stations or other storage points? Were drivers actually demanding more fuel?

Just wondering if this is a true demand "pull" or something else.

John

DON'T believe it. they paid economists lobbyists and journalists to put something to the public for a reason not to panic. oh the price goes up because of demand. blah blah... It's bogus...

Mike

It is called CONTROL and DEMAND!

Glenn H

This is suspect at best...guess they're just priming us to get ripped off for the summer months ahead. Boy, they must really think the average consumer is just plain stupid!

kj

Glenn, the if the average consumer is really smart they will stop buying big SUV's everytime gas prices have a temporary dip.

RS

Like the other comments, I have real doubts that this is true. For sure the title of the post is misleading as the demand isnt an all time high, but production.....still iffy

Major

Time to get serious about saving fuel. Stop-start systems should be standard on every vehicle sold in the US, if not a full hybrid system. Increase production of biodiesel fuel and cellulosic ethanol, and boost fuel taxes with the money going to balancing the budget and fixing the roads.

Thinkerdude

And all this blah, blah, to tell people that they want to rise the gas prices?

Belly

Something that bothers me about this post:

"demand for gasoline in the U.S. hit an all-time high in March. U.S. refineries produced more than 9.3 million barrels of gas per day."

But a story at the beginning of last year, citing demand in 2008 had this to say:

"The American oil industry produced fewer than 5 million barrels a day, which is the lowest rate of production in 63 years."

and this...
"Keep in mind that in just 2006 America was producing more than 8 million barrels a day."

http://blogs.cars.com/kickingtires/2009/01/us-gas-oil-demand-falls-dramatically-in-2008.html

How do these numbers square up?

Dan

No one in government or industry is smart enough to pull off a manipulation of the market and news of this magnitude. You can all put your tin hats away.

paul d.

so they are going to jack gas prices for the summer? wow! thats new, and we are pulling out of a recession? i havnt really seen evidence of that either. i have heard (dont know exactly how accurate it is) that 70% of a barrel of oil is made into plastics, and plastics are killing the environment more than fumes from cars, i know for a fact that there is a huge plastic island floating around in the ocean, if you dont believe that look it up.

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