U.S. EV Battery Production Planned

Ionbattery

One of the big problems that's rarely discussed in the tizzy around hybrid electric and plug-in electric vehicles becoming massively adopted is the availability of the batteries that power them. Today, there are no U.S. plants that can build large quantities of lithium-ion batteries for use in cars.

That’s why 14 U.S. tech companies will ask for $1 billion in federal aid from the Obama administration to build such a plant stateside. Among the companies are 3M Corp, Johnson Controls and smaller firms like Mobius Power, which couldn’t afford to build a large-scale plant on its own.

Most of today’s lithium-ion plants are based in Asia, where labor costs are lower. It’s also hard for U.S. companies to raise funds for an advanced facility when the products that will need them, like the Chevy Volt, aren’t in production yet.

U.S. Firms Join Forces to Build Car Batteries (Wall Street Journal)

By David Thomas | December 19, 2008 | Comments (3)

Comments 

We don't build a lot of the components for a car thesee days. Why the concern over whether batteries will be built here? I guarantee that they cannot be manufacturerd in this country on a competitive basis. So much for the great idea of an American battery factory.

i too think it is not pssoible easily.

DodgeFan

The cheapness of batteries in Asia is artifical. It would actually be cheaper to manufacture them here. The currency manipulation makes it appear cheaper. The U.S. Government has 10 trillion in debt, no other country has that much debt. The dollar should be worth nothing but the paradox is that it is worth alot.

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